Song – Sing a Rainbow

Standard

Two new families came along today. One of the children has a favourite song – Sing a Rainbow. We have never sung that song at playgroup, so we muddled along, and mostly got it right. The little boy, 10 months old, didn’t rouse on us for getting the words wrong. It’s such a lovely song.

Sing a Rainbow
Red and yellow and pink and green Purple and orange and blue I can sing a rainbow, sing a rainbow, sing a rainbow too.
Listen with your eyes,    Listen with your eyes, and sing everything you see, I can sing a rainbow, sing a rainbow, sing along with me.
Red and yellow and pink and green, Purple and orange and blue, I can sing a rainbow, sing a rainbow, sing a rainbow too!
.
Narelle

Song – Three Little Fishies

Standard
.
Down in the meadow in a itty bitty pool
Swam three little fishies and a mama fishie too
“Swim” said the mama fishie, “Swim if you can”
And they swam and they swam all over the dam
.
Boop boop dittum dattum wattum choo!
Boop boop dittum dattum wattum choo!
And they swam and they swam all over the dam
“Stop” said the mama fishie, “or you will get lost”
The three little fishies didn’t wanna be bossed
The three little fishies went off on a spree
And they swam and they swam right out to the sea
.
Boop boop dittum dattum wattum choo!
Boop boop dittum dattum wattum choo!
And they swam and they swam right out to the sea
“Whee!” yelled the little fishies, “Here’s a lot of fun
We’ll swim in the sea till the day is done”
They swam and they swam, and it was a lark
Till all of a sudden they saw a shark!
.
Boop boop dittum dattum wattum choo!
Boop boop dittum dattum wattum choo!
Till all of a sudden they saw a shark!
“Help!” cried the little fishies, “Gee! look at all the whales!”
And quick as they could, they turned on their tails
And back to the pool in the meadow they swam
And they swam and they swam back over the dam
.
Boop boop dittum dattum wattum choo!
Boop boop dittum dattum wattum choo!
And they swam and they swam back over the dam.
.
.
.

Song – The Wonky Donkey

Standard

We’ve read the Wonky Donkey book many times, and today we played the CD for a special treat. Yee Haw!

.

.

And if all of that wasn’t enough fun, our little Ruby was 2 years old today. Ruby was about three days old when she first came to the group. We’ve had weekly snapshots of her development since she was born and that is such a precious thing. Her mum, Belinda, makes the most beautiful cakes, and brought in a cake to share. Happy Birthday Ruby!

Narelle

Songs – from Romper Room

Standard

Although they are not new songs for old girls like me, some parents haven’t heard the Romper Room classics “Watch me walk so straight and tall” and “Bend and stretch”. They never get old (hehe).

.

Watch me walk so straight and tall
I won’t let my bean bag fall                 (in the original song, it was ‘basket’ instead of ‘bean bag’)
Eyes ahead, and don’t look down
Keep that bean bag off the ground.
.
Bend and stretch
Reach for the stars
There goes Jupiter
Here comes Mars
Bend and stretch
Reach for the stars
Stand on tippy toe
Oh so high.
 

Narelle

Song – I am a fine musician

Standard

I brought in some musical instruments, and I was thinking that we could sing the song “I am a music man”. We would of course change the lyrics to “I am a musician” to include both boys and girls. But one of the parents, suggested another song called “I am a fine musician”, and it was a great choice. The children loved playing the instruments.

Here is a great version sung by the characters on Sesame Street…

.

.

Here is a photo of one of the instruments we played…

musical instrument

.

I don’t know what it’s called. It makes a great sound. One of the parents took a photo of this instrument and did some kind of snazzy Google search with the photo. Well, trusty old Google called the instrument a “handbag”, so we sang the “I am a fine musician song” and called this instrument a handbag. If you know what the instrument is called, please let us know, otherwise it is destined to be called a ‘handbag’ for the term of its natural life.

Apart from this ‘handbag’ instrument, we had a triangle, clap sticks, tambourine, finger cymbals, maracas, and chinese drum. My finger cymbals are very sweet, and the sound lasts for quite a long time. One of the children enjoyed listening to how long the sound lasted.

Narelle

Book – Green Eggs and Ham

Standard

Yesterday (2nd March) was Dr Seuss’ birthday.

He was a genius!

He put into his books what we now know contributes to children’s building blocks for learning how to read – vocabulary (including ‘rare’ words), rhyming, concepts such as near and far etc, and making up silly words and having fun with language.

Research shows that the more we talk, sing, and read with our children, the better their outcomes in all areas of their development (Hart & Risley being the most well known). Studies have shown that children who grow up in a language-rich environment have grown up to have more satisfying lives than those children who don’t. And don’t be afraid to use words that your children don’t know. Exposure to big words and ‘rare’ words increases their vocabulary which is great for developing their reading, speech, and language skills.

This week we read Green Eggs and Ham.

green eggs and ham

Do you like them? Have you tried them?

Here is an interesting fact about the book…

Bennett Cerf, Dr. Seuss’ editor, bet him that he couldn’t write a book using 50 words or less. The Cat in the Hat was pretty simple, after all, and it used 225 words. Not one to back down from a challenge, Mr. Geisel (Dr Seuss) started writing and came up with Green Eggs and Ham —which uses exactly 50 words.

The 50 words, by the way, are: a, am, and, anywhere, are, be, boat, box, car, could, dark, do, eat, eggs, fox, goat, good, green, ham, here, house, I, if, in, let, like, may, me, mouse, not, on, or, rain, Sam, say, see, so, thank, that, the, them, there, they, train, tree, try, will, with, would, you.

Source: http://mentalfloss.com/article/28843/10-stories-behind-dr-seuss-stories

So, Green Eggs and Ham isn’t all that great for extending children’s vocabulary, but it has lots of concepts, it’s really good fun, and it reinforces what parents say to children at the dinner table “how do you know you don’t like it if you haven’t tried it?”.

I mentioned to some of the parents that I love the very short story (more like a poem) titled ‘Too Many Daves’ by Dr Seuss, and they said they hadn’t heard it. So I’ll read it next week. It’s about a Mum who names all 23 of her children ‘Dave’.

Narelle Smith